Trump: CEO of the United States?

Photo%3A+Burlington+Free+Press
Photo: Burlington Free Press

Photo: Burlington Free Press

Photo: Burlington Free Press

Joey Mistretta

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Donald Trump is no ordinary president. To many Americans, the word “unpresidential” is seemingly synonymous with the Trump Administration. Indeed, the White House is buzzing with enough drama to craft a reality show. The President’s Twitter account has shared everything from disparaging remarks about the press to boasts about the size of his manhood. And Trump often seems more interested in speaking about what makes him great than what makes the country great. Donald Trump is no ordinary president. But the way I see it, Trump isn’t acting as President of the United States. He’s acting as he has acted his entire life: as a CEO.

Critics of Trump will be quick to point out that “CEO” appears nowhere in the Constitution and that calling Trump “CEOOTUS” instead of “POTUS” is a desperate attempt to defend the unpopular President. But hear me out. Trump’s official role be damned, to view him as CEO at the very least helps to put into perspective and even rationalize his outlandish behavior.

A president, at least in the traditional sense, exists to represent his people. A CEO exists to just get the job done. Whereas past presidents spoke on behalf of their fellow citizens, when Trump speaks, he speaks on behalf of… well, Trump. The modern presidency has been defined as a seat where its holder’s every move is dignified, nuanced, and a reflection of the American people. But Trump is changing that. Trump, by intention, makes no such attempt to do so. His tweets today follow the exact same format as they did half a decade ago, denigrating the same “haters and losers” and lobbing the same insults at his “enemies” in 2018 just as they did when The Donald was still chief executive of The Trump Organization.

Now, that doesn’t magically excuse such childish acts as Trump’s “Fake News Awards” or his merciless nicknames for those who oppose him. But in many cases, such behavior doesn’t seem so bad if we don’t view them as representing us. They weren’t meant to represent us. They’re merely a reflection of the thoughts of a fellow citizen named Donald Trump. When Disney CEO Bob Iger tweets something, he’s speaking on behalf of Bob Iger, not Disney. @RealDonaldTrump isn’t a vessel to uplift the American spirit; it’s the personal soapbox of a man who just so happens to be running the country.  

His tirades against “Crooked Hillary” impact the functionality of the United States government no more than his 2013 Twitter war with “loser Rosie O’Donnell” impacted the functionality of The Trump Organization (read: they didn’t). Silly as they may be, they have minimal impact on our actual lives. When Trump says something stupid, sure it’s embarrassing, but it’s not weakening the effectiveness of the country’s ability to govern. Rampages against the “fake news” are simply a man’s defense of himself; there is no actual threat against the freedom of press. The so-called conflict in the White House rarely amounts to more than soap opera drama to discuss around the water cooler. The country moves on, the same as it would have with a President Hillary Clinton or anybody else in office.

Donald Trump did not run for president for ceremony or to celebrate the goodness of American values. He ran to get the job done.

And get the job done he has. The stock market has soared to record highs in every major indicator, forcefully and sharply increasing an already strong but relatively stagnant stock market under President Obama. Unemployment is at its lowest rate in almost two decades, dropping sharply soon after Trump entered office. (Nevermind that slightly fewer jobs were added in 2017 than 2016—the rate of jobs added has been steadily decreasing annually as the economy nears full employment. ) The yearly GDP is projected to have grown by over 3%, a figure that was never reached under President Obama. Though it can be tempting to credit President Obama with such successes, bear in mind that these factors are largely influenced by consumer confidence, which dramatically spiked following Trump’s inauguration and reached a 13-year high, thanks to a business-friendly agenda which has included Trump’s withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the Paris Climate Accord, massive deregulation, and huge tax cuts, especially those on corporations and businesses. Illegal border crossings are down nearly 60% from 2016. The Small Business Optimism Index even jumped 12 points after Trump was elected and has remained high. Regardless of whether you’re a fan of Trump’s policies, it’s hard to say he hasn’t gotten the job done.

Trump is a man of business, a man of negotiation, a man of action. But he’s not a man of words. He never has been. His mouth produces the same brash, loud, bumbling voice that made him famous in the 1980s. He’s not a man to uplift. He’s not even a president in the traditional sense. He’s here to get the grunt work done. As I’ve said, none of what I’ve written is to excuse what Trump says or does. But it might help us understand why he says and does what he does. Without oversimplifying the issues (much of which I hope to address specifically in future articles), this perspective at least helps put a perspective on Trump’s enigmatic behavior, makes it a little easier to swallow. It is time we stop focusing on Trump’s flawed but inconsequential personality and instead focus on the work he is getting done. To do otherwise does little more than further our wide divisions, and would be, as Trump puts it, “Sad!”

Sources:

http://money.cnn.com/data/markets/dow/

https://tradingeconomics.com/united-states/unemployment-rate

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/jobs-growth-disappointment-wont-stop-june-hike-but-may-cap-future-increases-2017-06-02

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/12/14/trump-could-get-3-percent-and-maybe-even-4-percent-gdp-growth-this-quarter.html

http://www.businessinsider.com/consumer-confidence-umich-october-2017-10

http://www.cnn.com/2017/12/14/politics/trump-deregulation-in-gifs/index.html

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/10/12/us/politics/trump-border-claim-factcheck.html

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/06/goldman-sachs-trump-trade-rides-surging-small-business-confidence.html

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Trump: CEO of the United States?

    Opinion

    Hullabaloo!

  • Trump: CEO of the United States?

    Opinion

    New Homework Policy

  • Trump: CEO of the United States?

    Opinion

    The World Isn’t So Bad After All

  • Trump: CEO of the United States?

    Editorial

    Saving Secular Government

  • Trump: CEO of the United States?

    Opinion

    President Trump, A Year Later

  • Trump: CEO of the United States?

    Opinion

    On The War on Drugs

  • Trump: CEO of the United States?

    Opinion

    Rap Enters the Political Sphere

  • Trump: CEO of the United States?

    JibberJabber

    Should Statues Stay or Go?

  • Trump: CEO of the United States?

    Opinion

    Protest or Pass?

  • Opinion

    We’re In This Together

Trump: CEO of the United States?